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Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Quilting in High Cotton



I will never understand why people keep looking for alternative natural fibers for quilting - you can’t get much more environmentally friendly than cotton.  Cotton is a renewable resource that has stood the test of time – cotton fabrics have been found in ancient tombs that are thousands of years old.  Not only is cotton an eco-friendly fiber, but the cotton used in Dream Cotton is grown and processed in the U.S.A.!


Did you know:

·       Colonists wore “homespun cotton” as a symbol of American independence.

·       George Washington indicated that homespun cotton was the only clothing “fashionable for a gentleman to appear in.”

·       In the late 1700’s, British law prohibited emigration of persons familiar with textile machinery into the United States.

·       Cotton helped speed communications by providing insulation for the telegraph invented by Samuel Morse.

·       Thomas Edison used charred cotton for the filament in the first electric light.

·       The Wright Brothers used cotton muslin to cover the wings on their first plane.

·       In WWI, cotton linter (cottonseed residue) was used to make smokeless gun powder.

·       Cotton provided biological isolation suits for astronauts on their return from the moon.

·       Today, more than 300,000 Americans are employed in the cotton industry.



Dream Cotton is light-weight, wonderful for hand and machine quilting, drapes beautifully, and is very consistent.  We use the highest grade fibers in the industry, which means only the longest fibers are used.  This is important because longer fibers mean less shrinkage, less bearding, and virtually no lint on the machine.  The longer the fibers are, the more places the fibers will intersect, making the batting so strong that you can stitch up to 8 inches apart. 

So support our farmers, support our environment, support your local quilt shop, and let Dream Cotton support your quilt!



Happy Quilting!
 ~The Dream Team




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